ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE: STUDENTS’ EXPERIENCES ON READING IN ONE SOUTH AFRICAN UNIVERSITY

Manthekeleng A Linake, Matseliso L Mokhele

Abstract


The students have difficulties in identifying language and textual elements and the purposes for reading, which include the examination of literary experience and the ability to acquire and use information appropriately. Thus, students lack reading skills that function as key barrier to academic achievement, which has resulted to poor performance, and even drop out in their overall academic undertaking. There are many other factors that constitute this causality such as:  socio-economic status, teaching methods, parental involvement and lack of exposure to LoLT are probably the most important.  The study examined reading strategies and training that are available for students in the university and explored how current teachers’ training programmes prepare students for EFAL teaching including reading instructional strategies that are promoted in teacher’s training. Using qualitative case study design, this paper explores students’ experiences on reading with the use of English first additional language (FAL) in one South African University. It was an interpretive study based on a case study design that took place for the duration of four years. The findings showed that language learning could be easier if it is considered as a social practice with an academic purpose. The study concludes that students prefer to be taught in English although most see it as a barrier to learning.


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